ESGM - Basic and Advanced Course in Genetic Counselling in Practice 2012

Submitted: Tuesday 26th of June 2012 03:04:58 PM
Submitted by: egf
Language: English
Educational levels: expert, qc2, qc3

Topics

Abstract

This course represents an evolution of the `Genetic Counselling in Practice` courses that has run successfully over the past ten years. The new course has been divided into two parts. The first part includes basic scientific information and clinical skills needed for genetic healthcare practice, including prenatal, cancer genetics, ethics and laboratory testing. The second part will focus on the counselling and communication skills required by those working with patients and their families. All students will be encouraged to practise their counselling skills in a supportive environment and to give and receive feedback. The course will include some exercises and discussion sessions aimed at facilitating professional and personal self-awareness of students, in order to enhance their genetic counselling practice. The course will include sessions on supporting patients through decision-making, prenatal and presymptomatic testing. Target: Clinical geneticists, genetic counsellors, genetic nurses and trainees in those professions. Students who are new to genetic healthcare should not attempt Part 2 without first completing part 1. Very experienced genetics practitioners may wish to do Part 2 only.

Resources

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The necessity of screening and testing children at risk brings along its own sensitivities. The natural wish of parents is to ensure the safe and normal development of their offspring. However, in families at risk of genetic diseases, the future of a child can be shadowed by the chance that life may ...
The tasks of mourning (Worden) 1. Unreality 2. Acceptance of the reality 3. Pain of loss 4. Adjusting to present 5. Reinvestment in future. Grief issues Families affected by a genetic condition often experience a series of multiple losses, leading to continual cycles of grief. There may ...
Basic themes All individuals have three ego states. These influence our thoughts and behavioural responses in a given situation. Individuals operate according to ‘preconscious life scripts’, that can however be changed. The counsellor’s role is to facilitate the changing of scripts and to ...
The term screening applies to the application of a test or tests in a general population in which most individuals will be considered at low risk.1 Screening is used as a method of identifying those in the population whose risk might be significantly high to warrant the offer of further diagnostic t ...
In the past twenty years the demand for clinical genetic services and genetic counselling has increased enormously alongside the major advances in genetic science. Although accurate genetic counselling relies on a firm medical diagnosis, accepted definitions of genetic counselling also emphasise the ...
Principles regarding consent for procedures and protecting the confidentiality of medical information are enshrined in codes governing ethical practice. They are also subject to statutory oversight which may vary according to the area of administration. It can be argued that medical genetics is no ...
The rapid and continuing progress in gene discovery for complex diseases is fuelling interest in the potential implications of this knowledge for clinical and public health practice. One of the prominent expectations is that preventive and therapeutic interventions can be more effectively administer ...

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Keywords

abnormal, Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, acrocentric, adenomatous polyposis coli, affected, affected sib-pair, allele, amniocentesis, amniotic fluid, Analysis of the entire coding region: Mutation scanning, Analysis of the entire coding region: Sequence analysis, aneuploidy, anticipation, Array genomic hybridization, artificial insemination by donor, association, autism, autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, bacterial artificial chromosome, balanced translocation, band, banding, base pair, biomarker, BRCA, carrier, carrier screening, carrier testing, cascade screening, cell, cell culture, centromere, chorionic villus sampling, chromosome, chromosome abnormality, chromosome painting, clinical geneticist, clinical genetics, competent, Complementary DNA, complex disease, congenital, consanguineous, constitutional, counsellee, cytogenetics, cytoplasm, de novo, deletion, deoxyribonucleic acid, diagnostic test, dicentric, diploid number, disruption, diversity region, dna microarray, dominant, duplication, dysmorphic feature, dysmorphology, dysplasia, epidermal growth factor, epigenetics, exon, expression, familial, familial adenomatous polyposis, family history, fc, fetus, fibroblast, fitness, fluorescent in situ hybridization, frequency, gamete, gene, genetic condition, genetic counselling, genetic counsellor, genetic disease, genetic screening, geneticist, genetics, genome, genotype, genotyping, germ line mutation, haploid, haplotype analysis, helix, hereditary, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, heredity, heritability, high throughput, human genome project, Human immunodeficiency virus, hydrocephalus, imprinting, in situ hybridization, incidence, incomplete penetrance, index case, informed consent, inherited, insertion, interference, interphase, inversion, isochromosome, isolated, karyotype, kilobase, km, linkage, linkage disequilibrium, locus, long interspersed nuclear element, malformation, marker, marker chromosome, maternal, meiosis, messenger rna, metacentric, metaphase, microarray, microdeletion, microdeletion syndrome, molecular genetic testing, monogenic, monogenic disease, monosomy, mosaicism, multifactorial, multifactorial trait, mutation, neuroscience, nondisjunction, nucleus, obligate carrier, paint, paracentric inversion, parental, pedigree, penetrance, pericentric inversion, phenotype, polymorphism, population, predictive testing, prenatal diagnosis, prenatal screening, presymptomatic testing, prevalence, probe, processing, protein, qualitative, rearrangement, recombination, recurrence risk, ribonucleic acid, ring chromosome, risk assessment, risk estimates, screening, sensitivity, sequence, signal transduction, single nucleotide polymorphism, specificity, spina bifida, spontaneous abortion, submetacentric, subtelomeric region, syndrome, target dna, telomere, trait, transition, translation, translocation, trisomy, ultrasound, unaffected, unbalanced translocation, uniparental disomy, variable expressivity, variation, x-chromosome, zygote

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